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A Tactile Notion: A collaboration between Kim McCollum and Brianna Tosswill

November 17, 2020

A Tactile Notion: A collaboration between Kim McCollum and Brianna Tosswill

Hi there! It's Kim here, and I have some exciting news to share! One of the things I have been missing during the pandemic is the ability to see and touch all of the handmade textiles that come through our door at Gather. The tactile element of what we do as makers is hugely important. There is a knowledge that comes from touching things that cannot be gained any other way. Out of a love for handmade things, and a desire to bring the handwoven textiles in our studio to you, a new project was born.


"A Tactile Notion"
A collaboration between
Kim McCollum and Brianna Tosswill

Presale begins Nov 19, 10:00AM MST
Available while supplies last
I have teamed up with the talented printmaker Brianna Tosswill. She brings an equal passion for handmade things and an uncanny ability to transform ideas into beautiful figurative linocut prints. When we started putting some of her prints next to my weavings, they had a visual and tactile connection. Both weaving and printmaking are labor intensive practices with rich histories. We are excited to bring these two ways of working together in a neat package, tied up with string of course!
Our new project, "A Tactile Notion" brings a handwoven swatch, associated weaving draft, and linocut print quarterly to your doorstep over the next 12 months.
When you have a handwoven swatch, you can look closely, and 'read' the story of the weft thread as it makes its way across the warp. The first of four editions is an overshot swatch and a linocut print of a reader - weaver. Brianna puts everything together in a hand printed letterpress package for safekeeping. 
Find out more about Brianna's work here. Find out more about my work here.

I can't wait for you to hold this gorgeous bundle of woven sample and print in your own hands! In these hand making practices, the evidence of process is visible in the way the ink sites on the page and the way some fibres raise above others, but only when you look (and touch) very closely. 





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