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Evening Sky Scarf Pattern

November 14, 2020

Evening Sky Scarf Pattern

When you combine opposites, sometimes you get the best of both worlds. This scarf has a cottolin warp and an alpaca weft. Cottolin lends structure and sheen to the piece while light-as-air alpaca adds softness. The result is an elegant scarf with great drape that is surprisingly light for how much warmth it provides. Designed in soothing colours that remind us of dark sky over a quiet desert, this scarf adds a touch of grace and calm to your winter wardrobe. 

Finding unexpectedly perfect fibre combinations like this is part of what keeps us weaving. It’s always a bit of a surprise to see and feel the cloth that emerges after wet finishing. In this case, we hit the yarn combo jackpot. Light and warm, strong and soft… and absolutely delicious to wear.

Drape is one of those qualities that weavers obsess over, but that is hard to put into words. If you slowly lower a scarf onto a table, one with great drape folds into a slinky puddle. It melts around your neck and over your shoulders. To really know the drape of a piece you have to get your hands on it.  You know great drape when you feel it. And this scarf has great drape.

The Evening Sky Scarf is available as a kit, as well as a PDF pattern download. We also have pre-made warps available for this project!






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